brain

Food for the Brain

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Author: Laura Freeman

Spring is a stressful time for many of us, whether it’s because we’re finalizing taxes, planning a big trip for the summer, or applying for jobs or internships. Overwhelmed with everything that needs to be done, and everything we want to do, we tend to overlook one of our basic needs – healthy eating. Too often, I find myself stopping by the Jack in the Box across the street for a quick meal and an Oreo milkshake, or ordering Italian from Postmates on the days I feel like spending a bit more. Besides contributing to the United States’ obesity epidemic, unhealthy eating can intensify the effects of a brain injury (Wolpert).

Studies also show that diets high in saturated fats and trans fats can hinder cognition. In particular, the consumption junk food and fast food has shown adverse effects on learning and memory (Wolpert). Fortunately, just as there are bad foods for the brain, there are also good foods! Folic acid, found in various foods such as spinach and oranges, is critical for brain function. Likewise, omega-3 fatty acids have been used to treat Alzheimers, as well as other memory deficits (Wolpert). Other healthy foods include whole grains, beans, seeds, and tea (Sorgen).

This got me thinking about how healthy eating may help me feel less stressed and more energetic. It isn’t that I enjoy eating fast food or ordering from Postmates every night – it’s just more convenient and cheaper (or so I thought). What could I make that is quick and healthy?

And then, it hit me: grain bowls! Grain bowls, like Mason jar salads and avocado toast have been all the rage lately, but they usually use expensive “superfoods”, like chia seeds, quinoa, and out-of-season avocados. Even though I can’t afford to use those ingredients regularly, I could still make grain bowls with cheaper alternatives!

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With those healthy brain foods in mind, I make a quick stop at Trader Joe’s and discover, to my delight, that the ingredients for five portions amounted to only $11.93 – cheaper than my average Postmates order! I begin peeling sweet potatoes, grinding spices, sautéing chickpeas, roasting tofu, boiling farro, and cubing feta cheese. Soon enough, it all comes together as a stunning, aromatic cornucopia of healthy foods. In just one hour of prepping and cooking, I managed to make enough food for the whole week’s lunches. In my mind, it’s a win-win-win situation; I pay less for healthier food that makes me feel energized and focused on the busy season to come.

 

Sources:

Sorgen, C. (2006). Eat Smart for a Healthier Brain. Retrieved April 10, 2018

Wolpert, S. (2008, July 09). Scientists learn how what you eat affects your brain - and those of your kids. Retrieved April 10, 2018

Tommy Manning Act

Author: Aimee Garcia

Seattle has a relatively new initiative to help people with traumatic brain injury named The Washington Traumatic Brain Injury Strategic Partnership Advisory Council, commonly known as the Tommy Manning Act. It was created through House Bill 2055 by the Washington State Legislature in 2007. It is to “recognize the current programs and services are not funded or designed to address the diverse needs of individuals with traumatic brain injuries.”  Its creation is to close the gap in knowledge by collecting the expertise from both the public and private sector. Membership includes twenty two people from both sectors that includes medical professionals, human service providers, family members of individuals, state agency representatives, and many more that can provide useful information to advance their agenda.

The Tommy Manning Act has taken upon itself to work in unison with the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services to address some of their goals. Unfortunately, the Manning Act has not posted their own goals on their website but directs the reader to the DSHS website, where they do not explicitly have goals that directly affect people with brain injuries.

Though the act is still fairly, new it could potentially have the momentum to change the lives and the families of those who have been affected by traumatic brain injuries. Yet, they have not stated their own goals and rely heavily on DSHS without any visible momentum to directly address the concerns of people with brain injuries. Yes, the program are only eleven years old but in those years, there has not been noticeable change for the people most in need.

Sources:

“Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council.” Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council | DSHS, www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/traumatic-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury-advisory-council.

“About Us.” About Us | DSHS, www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/about-us.

 

What Licensed Naturopaths Say About MS

Author: Catherine Waterbury

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, MS is “an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body.” MS effects more than 2.3 million people worldwide and can be extremely difficult to diagnose. Unfortunately, there is not a cure for MS. Common treatments for MS include: teaming up with a healthcare provider, taking pharmaceutical medication, and participating in physical therapy.

MS-Symptoms-FB
MS-Symptoms-FB

Other treatment options for MS are referred to as “Commentary or Alternative Medicines” (CAM). These treatments include exercise, alternative diet, and the addition of supplements. In a study done by members of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, 52% of the naturopaths being surveyed suggested dietary changes to treat MS. The study also indicated that 45% of the naturopaths suggested essential fatty acid supplementation and 33% suggested vitamin/mineral supplementation. At the end of the study, 59% of patients claimed they experienced an improved quality of life by using a CAM system.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society advises those with MS to not “abandon conventional therapy” and be sure to “keep your physician informed about everything you are taking”. With that being said, if you are interested in adding elements of CAM system to your treatment, you should! There are a large variety of therapies you could try, including: acupuncture, nutrition lessons, exercise, cooking classes, and many more!

Can-acupuncture-mend-a-broken-heart
Can-acupuncture-mend-a-broken-heart

If you have MS and are interested in an CAM style therapy, The Plus One Foundation may be able to help you fund your therapy. Please look over our website for more information!

Sources:

"Home." National Multiple Sclerosis Society. N.p., 16 Feb. 2018. Web. 20 Feb. 2018.

"All IssuesUp Arrow In This IssueDown Arrow Left ArrowPrevious Article Next ArticleRight Arrow The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine About This Journal... Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis: Survey of Licensed Naturopaths." The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. N.p., n.d. Web.