Go to Sleep

Author: Daniel Nguyen

I love sleeping, but like most people I sometimes have difficulty going to sleep. We spend a third of our lives sleeping, and making sure you get a sufficient amount of sleep is much more important than you think. Have you ever find yourself staying up at 3am because you just can’t go to sleep? I know it sucks, I’ve been there. But I personally have several methods that have worked for me to get myself to sleep. One method is exercise. Not only is exercise alone good for your health, but I found that moderate exercise in the evening helps me go to sleep because it helps me feel tired. Having a 30 minute jog never fails to make me have the urge to sleep. Another method is resetting your sleeping schedule. What I mean by this is that if you find yourself waking up super late because you stayed up late, set an alarm early such as 8:00, and FORCE yourself to wake up at that time. Don’t take any naps that day, and by the time your bedtime rolls around, you’ll feel very tired and will very likely fall asleep easily. One of the last methods I use to fall asleep is to avoid caffeine. I don’t mean avoid it entirely, but refrain from drinking it in the evening. Coffee in the morning is okay, but as a college student I know many others who use caffeine to help stay up late to study. Caffeine prevents you from falling asleep easily, and you also shouldn’t put off sleep. Sleep is way more important than you may realize.

This year in spring quarter I took an applied mathematics class, and before the midterm my professor gave a short speech in class about sleep. He mentioned how important it is for us to sleep and that he would rather have us get a good sleep than spend the whole night studying. Based on my experiences, I very much agree with him. If you don’t think sleeping is that important, a news article published by the Perspectives on Psychological Science has Christopher Barnes (from the University of Washington) and Christopher Drake (from Henry Ford Hospital) explained how sleep deprived workers will likely make more mistakes, lose creativity, lose self awareness, and an overall negative impact on self-control. So sleep as a whole is very important to our brain because depriving yourself with sleep with impact your thinking and cognitive function. So if you have something important tomorrow such as a test or interview, I would highly suggest to think twice if you’re thinking about staying up. You will perform at best if you get a good night sleep!

 

Sources:

"The Working World Has a Sleep Crisis." Association for Psychological Science. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 June 2018.

Social Media: Redirecting the Message Behind the Post

By: Natalie Andrewski

When the social media aspect of the internet began to develop with outlets such as Myspace and Tumblr, the issues surrounding online bullying began to become the focus of parents and schools alike. People could hide behind the anonymity of fake accounts to perpetuate their cruel comments and opinions. These technological insults initially seemed innocent and without consequences, but the reality of this issue has come to fruition with “cyberbullying strongly related suicidal ideation in comparison with traditional bullying”. On a less severe note, it has been determined that overall the explosion of platforms, such as Instagram and Facebook that rely highly on the factor of “likes” and “comments”, has led to a sadder society. The ideas of instant gratification and the hunger for constant positive feedback have become overwhelming triggers within our daily lives. It has been found that these ideas “can lead users to constantly compare themselves to others and think less of their own lives, potentially leading to negative feelings such as jealousy or low self esteem”.

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 3.50.35 PM.png

I recently read the book The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover by M.D. Robert Lustig, in which the author discusses why our society has gradually become more and more (reportedly in the use of anti-depressants and increase in the obesity epidemic) unhappy over the years. He uses a scientific approach to conceptualize the chemical imbalances the growing majority of our society faces. Rather than stimulating our serotonin reuptake (elongated contentment), we (as a nation) are continuously utilizing our dopamine reward pathways through the stimulation of sugar, social media, and other instantly gratifying triggers. Our ability to achieve high peaks of temporary and instantaneous happiness has led us to be continuously searching for the next peak, but does this lead to lower and lower valleys between each peak?

As the social media craze continues to captivate our nation, organizations and individuals are attempting to counter our current internet climate through identifying ways in which to achieve inner-happiness and enforce self-care. My best friend Brynnen recently launched the “Self-Care Project” through an Instagram account, as well as a blog linked to the Instagram account. Her project’s mission is to interview athletes, activists, and other inspirational people about their struggles, as well as successes, involving their journey with mental and physical health. After struggling with severe depression, Brynnen hopes to use social media for good by perpetuating the message of positive self-care techniques and creating a supportive community for those struggling with their holistic health. She describes her goal within the project as to “share with you that we all struggle, but we all have ways to get through it to maintain our mental health”. Follow Brynnen’s project @selfcareprojects for more information!

 

Sources:

“Suicide.” Megan Meier Foundation. Cyberbullying.
Fuller , Kristen. “Are We Allowing Social Media to Dictate Our Happiness?” Psychology Today,
Sussex Publisher.
Beierle, Brynnen. The Self Care Project, theselfcareproject.org/.

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 3.50.44 PM.png

Blindness Brain Adaptations

Author: Olivia Tang

Hi all, hope you all are doing well with the Seattle sunshine. Enjoy this segue to my speal about how millennials like me are best absorbing information nowadays through the internet.

So recently, I’ve been exploring the YouTube community in my free time, to find more content I can watch. I came across a blind YouTuber, Molly Burke, a content creator, and inspirational speaker about her life as a blind person who lost her sight to Retinitis Pigmentosa.

Her channel was interesting and inspiring to me, because she emphasizes how people who are blind can do things and live life like any other person can. She has a video on her channel on how blind people use technology, and I think it is a very informative and eye-opening video about how universal accessibility impacts the sensory disabled community. After visiting her channel, I looked more into how a person’s sensory functions adapt to their vision loss.

I’m amazed at blind person’s ability to hone their other four sensory functions, hearing, touch,smell, taste to accomplish anything. My late grandfather, who was blind, was able to tell me details about the construction of a room after tapping his walking stick on the floor. According to this study about the structural changes on the brain from blindness, the portion of the brain that accounts for sight shrinks, but the portions that do not account for vision increase in size(University). Researchers found that in the blind groups involved in the study, the frontal lobe which is responsible for working memory, was abnormally enlarged, most likely because blind people rely on memory to know the placement of things they can’t see.

I’m happy to have discovered Molly Burke on YouTube. I’ve learned a lot through her videos and through internet research, and I think her story and her message is very inspiring to anyone who comes across her. I highly suggest checking out her channel!

 

Sources:

University of California - Los Angeles. "Blindness causes structural brain changes, implying brain can re-organize itself to adapt." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091118143259.htm>.

I Tried Bullet Journaling: A Popular Creative Outlet

Author: Kelsey Fukuda

I recently picked up a new habit that’s been both fun and has helped me with organizing my thoughts. Bullet journaling is a fairly new trend that’s been appearing in a lot of my YouTube recommended videos, on Facebook, and on Pinterest. Bullet journals use “rapid logging”, which is quicker to jot down than other types of journals. The fun thing about bullet journals is that you can really customize it to be whatever you need it to be. In my case, I use my bullet journal as a planner, to-do list, and inspiration board. The format of my bullet journal is fairly similar to others out there. Each month has a cover page, each week has a weekly spread, and then there are extra pages used to write down ideas that I have.

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 6.13.52 PM.png

Not only has bullet journaling helped me organize my time, it has provided me with a creative outlet. Doodling and journaling are also proven to have cognitive benefits as well! Doodling is known to help with memory, stress relief, and improved focus. One researcher suggests that a reason why doodling is beneficial to us is the idea that doodles are similar to stress-relieving motor acts that alleviate impatience, boredom, and indecision. In some cases, doodling also helps with “affective attention”, which leads to increased watchfulness and concentration. On the other hand, journaling has its own benefits for your mental health and your brain. Journaling is known to help with managing anxiety and reducing stress by facilitating people to prioritize their problems and concerns, track their daily thoughts, and identify positive and negative thoughts or behaviors. Combining journaling and doodling creates a perfect pair.

Every week I try to sit down and plan my upcoming weekly spread. This helps me to organize my schedule and think about any important events I have coming up. At the start of every month, I like to think of a theme that I can stick with when designing my pages. Depending on the goals I have that month, I will sometimes create different visuals for tracking certain things such as habits, mood, sleep, and budget. I sometimes leave pages blank in case I want to create lists or have ideas to write down. For example, before traveling I like to list out places to see and things to eat in that area. Or sometimes I will have a list of recipes that I want to try. Even some gift idea lists are helpful to look back at. The great thing about bullet journals is that you can add whatever you need to it and make it your own. Personally, I like to look at Pinterest for ideas and then adjust them to my preferences and needs. I would definitely recommend trying out bullet journaling! You get to decide how much time and effort you want to put into designing it, so it doesn’t have to be a chore to write down your schedule anymore.

 
ezgif.com-resize .gif
 


 

Sources:

Schott, GD. "Doodling and the Default Network of the Brain." The Lancet. N.p., n.d. Web.

Pillay, Srini. "The "thinking" Benefits of Doodling." Harvard Health Blog. N.p., 11 Dec. 2016. Web. 08 May 2018.

"Journaling for Mental Health." Eastman Institute for Oral Health - University of Rochester Medical Center. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 May 2018.

Hiking

Author: Catherine Bennion

As spring has arrived and summer is on its way, hiking is a great way to spend a beautiful Saturday afternoon with friends and family, or just by yourself enjoying nature. Living in Seattle with so many trails nearby, I love to spend afternoons with my family hiking. While sometimes it may be hard to find the motivation to get out and hike, as I find motivation is often hard to find when it comes to exercise, the views and feeling of accomplishment at the top will ultimately be more than worth while.

Not only is hiking a fun and active way to spend a day, but studies show that hiking is also very good for your brain and mental health as well. Studies show an increased amount of outdoor time can increase attention spans and creative problem-solving skills by as much as 50 percent. Being in nature, surrounded by beauty and away from the hustle and bustle of our busy lives, allows for a great opportunity to reflect, think, and enjoy the beauty of the world that we live in. It also provides an opportunity to unplug from technology for a while to just be with nature and have genuine time with friends and family, or time to reflect and think by yourself.

My mom, my two sisters, and I recently climbed Mt. Si, a mountain in the Cascades just over an hour outside of Seattle. My sisters and I begrudgingly put on our running shoes in the morning and pleaded to stay home that morning. In response to all of our complaining my mom exclaimed that this was going to be “forced family fun” and promised that we would have a good time. The hike up Mt. Si is about four miles to the top, much farther than I imagined I could hike. While the hike was long, and sometimes painful, the time I got to spend with my family laughing and playing games made the long trek up the mountain fun, even though we all complained about it in the beginning. When we finally reached the top, the views were incredible and the time and effort spent going up the hill seemed to not matter anymore compared to the feeling of accomplishment and gratitude to be able to be so in touch with nature. By the time we got back down to the bottom, my thighs were burning my legs felt like Jell-o but I felt great about myself and felt great about getting out of the house and being active for the day! While it may be hard to find the time or energy, a short hike or walk through a park, is always worth it for the feeling of peace and accomplishment when it’s finished.

 

Sources

Wise, Abigail. “Proof That Hiking Makes You Happier And Healthier.” The Huffington Post, TheHuffingtonPost.com, 7 Dec. 2017

Want to Improve Your Performance Even Though You Have Anxiety? Don't Stay Calm, Get Excited!

Author: Daniel Nguyen

As a college student, I constantly fall into situations and activities that lead to anxiety and stress. Whether I'm taking a final, heading to a job interview, or doing a presentation in front of my class, anxiety always seems to get the best of me. Most of the time my anxiety cripples down to the point where it can negatively impact how I present myself in these situations. If you find yourself in an anxiety-inducing activity, you may have tried to tell yourself to calm down and relax. Many of us have probably been told that doing this will help, but I am here to tell you that this is the complete opposite of what you should do. Believe it or not, if you want to perform better and help dampen the effects of anxiety, get excited! If you tell yourself to get excited, you may find that you will do much better in these situations than if you focused on relaxation!

Studies on college students at Harvard University has shown getting yourself to become excited helps with performance on activities that trigger anxiety.  In the study, they had 140 participants prepare a public speech. They randomly told people to say either, "I am excited!" or "I am calm." before they begin. It was found that those who said they were excited gave longer, persuasive, and relaxed speeches than those who said they were calm.

If you are unsure on how to get yourself to become excited, try saying out loud a simple statement on excitement! Telling yourself, "I am excited!" can lead you to adopt a more opportunistic mindset which can help bring you to feel more excited about your performance! On the other hand, telling yourself to calm down is ineffective and will most likely produce unwanted effects because you will start thinking about all the things that can go wrong in the performance. You want to instead tell yourself about how things can go really well in your performance, and getting yourself excited will help a lot with this.

I've always struggled with presentations and interviews, and fighting against anxiety makes it twice as worse. But gradually I became better at managing it. It used to be the case where even knowing that I'm about to present next will cause my heart to race and my body to get all sweaty and itchy. My voice would sound weak and at this point I would start messing up my sentences when I speak. Thankfully, near the end of high school I adopted the excitement method to try to help with my anxiety, and I would say it helped a ton! It's hard to explain, but if I'm getting excited for something, my thought process changes as a whole. It makes me feel like I'm showing the class something amazing rather than feeling like the class will be judging every move I make.

Being excited helps drift my focus away from irrational thoughts. Whenever I get anxiety, I start thinking negatively about how other people might perceive my actions. This would always cause me to lose my train of thought during a presentation or interview because I would think to myself, "Wait…are people understanding what I am saying right now?" and I would proceed to ponder about what my next word choices should be. All of this contributes to an overwhelming feeling of doom. Gratefully, getting myself to be excited helps clear this mindset because it shifts my attention from how people perceive me to how exciting the subject is!

In a nutshell, anxiety can be a big influence in the choices we make and how we act. Feeling excited about what you're about to dive into will highly improve your performance. While this did help me a ton, I wouldn't say this got rid of all of my anxiety. I still get nervousness and irrational thoughts from time to time, but this method has helped calm my anxiety down immensely. And to whomever is still reading this and needs help with anxiety, please don't try to calm yourself, instead become enthusiastic! Be thrilled that you have the chance to perform! Be inspired that you can finally do your presentation! Be eager to take that test and ace it! It's all about populating your mindset with positive attitude and thoughts!

 

Sources:

American Psychological Association. American Psychological Association, n.d. Web. 18 Apr. 2018.

Food for the Brain

final1.jpg

Author: Laura Freeman

Spring is a stressful time for many of us, whether it’s because we’re finalizing taxes, planning a big trip for the summer, or applying for jobs or internships. Overwhelmed with everything that needs to be done, and everything we want to do, we tend to overlook one of our basic needs – healthy eating. Too often, I find myself stopping by the Jack in the Box across the street for a quick meal and an Oreo milkshake, or ordering Italian from Postmates on the days I feel like spending a bit more. Besides contributing to the United States’ obesity epidemic, unhealthy eating can intensify the effects of a brain injury (Wolpert).

Studies also show that diets high in saturated fats and trans fats can hinder cognition. In particular, the consumption junk food and fast food has shown adverse effects on learning and memory (Wolpert). Fortunately, just as there are bad foods for the brain, there are also good foods! Folic acid, found in various foods such as spinach and oranges, is critical for brain function. Likewise, omega-3 fatty acids have been used to treat Alzheimers, as well as other memory deficits (Wolpert). Other healthy foods include whole grains, beans, seeds, and tea (Sorgen).

This got me thinking about how healthy eating may help me feel less stressed and more energetic. It isn’t that I enjoy eating fast food or ordering from Postmates every night – it’s just more convenient and cheaper (or so I thought). What could I make that is quick and healthy?

And then, it hit me: grain bowls! Grain bowls, like Mason jar salads and avocado toast have been all the rage lately, but they usually use expensive “superfoods”, like chia seeds, quinoa, and out-of-season avocados. Even though I can’t afford to use those ingredients regularly, I could still make grain bowls with cheaper alternatives!

Screen Shot 2018-04-11 at 1.16.29 PM.png

With those healthy brain foods in mind, I make a quick stop at Trader Joe’s and discover, to my delight, that the ingredients for five portions amounted to only $11.93 – cheaper than my average Postmates order! I begin peeling sweet potatoes, grinding spices, sautéing chickpeas, roasting tofu, boiling farro, and cubing feta cheese. Soon enough, it all comes together as a stunning, aromatic cornucopia of healthy foods. In just one hour of prepping and cooking, I managed to make enough food for the whole week’s lunches. In my mind, it’s a win-win-win situation; I pay less for healthier food that makes me feel energized and focused on the busy season to come.

 

Sources:

Sorgen, C. (2006). Eat Smart for a Healthier Brain. Retrieved April 10, 2018

Wolpert, S. (2008, July 09). Scientists learn how what you eat affects your brain - and those of your kids. Retrieved April 10, 2018

On Board: one Plus One staffer's personal experiences

Living with a brain or a body that doesn't work the same as other people's is hard. It's hard physically, and mentally; socially, as the world expects things that your brain and body can't deliver. One of my family members grew up with and lives with Autism. She was born in 1944, so Autism and the spectrum weren't commonly understood diagnoses. She was held to a standard which she could not reach and then punished for her differences. She's had a hard life. She's hyper focused, prone to paranoia, and full of fear but her life is not all darkness. The things that bring her joy light her face up and make such a difference in her life. Her laugh is so cute. As a caretaker, it's important for me to maximize those joy-related activities as much as possible.

Getting her active and out of her care facility is one of the things that brings her the most balance and happiness. Having access to physical activity in a caring environment is so important to her. For people like her who have limited access, who have perhaps fallen through the cracks in the system for most of their life, the opportunities Plus One provides can make the difference between good brain chemistry and depression, between isolation and a full life. I've seen personally the difference that swim therapy can make, that exercise can have for people like her.  I'm now on the board of Plus One and I'm so proud of the things that we're doing. I can't tell you how much it means to me to be able to work on a program that grants access to people who've never been considered or prioritized before in their lives. Some of my family member's life stories break my heart, but the program's she's participating in now, and the help that she's receiving gives me hope. 

Thank you Plus One, for all the people you prioritize, for all the brain changing services you enable, and for all your care.

Passion Over Pressure

Author: Siena Helland

I have been playing soccer for as long as I can remember, and I probably learned to kick a ball
before I learned to walk. The sport has been a large part of my life and has shaped me into the
person I am today. My dad introduced me to the sport at a young age, and my love for the game led me to playing for a club team. From there, I traveled across the United States competing against some of the top teams in the country, and I had my sights set on playing in college. As I was nearing the end of my high school years and preparing for college, I had realized that playing soccer was no longer fun. I no longer was excited to go to practice, compete in games, or wanted to play in college. My passion for the game was replaced by anxiety, and I was forced to outplay my friends so the college scouts would want me and not them. The pressure got to me, and by the end of my junior year of high school, I left my competitive team and lost my favoritesport.

After seeing the sadness from losing one of my favorite pass times, my dad had found a co-ed
adult team that I could join. My senior year of high school I had a trial run and they immediately invited me to join their team. It's now been three years and I continue to play every week with this team. This league is competitive and we play against good teams, but there is no pressure to be perfect, no one to impress, and no one subbing you out if you miss hit a ball. I finally found an atmosphere that allowed me to play soccer in a relaxed and pressure-free environment, providing me the happiness I'd been searching for.


Every week I look forward to my Thursday night games and being able to exercise, clear my
mind, and participate in an activity that I love. There are so many of us that exercise and play
sports in negative environments or under conditions that do not give us happiness, but instead
cause us stress. Exercise is supposed to be a stress reliever and provide us happiness along with good health. By finding joy in exercising, you create a healthy environment for yourself, not only physically, but mentally as well. Exercising can help you clear your mind of stressors and think about what's important to you. It can also help you find a positive attitude, boost your self-esteem, and bring happiness into your life. Exercising and playing a sport is one thing, but if you can do this while reducing stress and pressure and incorporating more passion and joy, the benefits of exercising will increase, and your well-being will thank you.

 

Sources:
Organic Facts. "Surprising Benefits of Playing Sports" Organic Facts.
https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/other/health- benefits-of- playing-sports.html.
Published February 14, 2018.

The Secret to Seasonal Sadness

Author: Natalie Andrewski

As the winter season blossoms into spring, it is almost impossible to notice a change of environment here in Seattle. Not only are flowers blooming and the sun is beginning to make more adamant appearances, but the people of this city seem to begin transitioning as well. During the winter months, the “Seattle Freeze”, as the often passive aggressive and not-so-welcoming demeanor of local Seattleites has been labeled by transplants, is very apparent. Groups of friends prefer to remain exclusive, and the activities they participate in may usually occur inside. However, once Spring has sprung, the frozen attitudes of Seattleites appears to defrost. Parks all over the city are filled with groups of people attempting the ever-tricky slack line, running with unexpected zeal, and hiking to new ascents. Rather than avoiding eye contact, members of the city are engaging in conversations with new people in attempt to try a new activity or finally say hello to a familiar face. I began to question why a singular season transition could have such a stark contrast in an entire city’s demeanor, and I believe my answer lies in the notion of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Growing up in Southern California, I was surrounded by sunshine basically 365 days a year. Most days were glorious enough to be spent outside, and my mom often referred to me as her “sunflower”. When I was in the 6th grade, my family migrated from California to the Pacific Northwest. Of course, the year we moved to Washington was recorded as having record rain fall in the Olympia area, and my days of playing outside were replaced with indoor entertainment. Even in my younger days, I knew my energy levels and happiness was positively correlated with my time spent in the sunshine. I began to struggle with depression, even though I didn’t quite understand that concept yet, and I would suffer from stress that would effect my quality of health poorly. After all these years, I have finally made the connection between the weather and my mood.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a “mood disorder subset in which people who have normal mental health throughout most of the year exhibit depressive symptoms at the same time each year, most commonly in the winter”. It is quite an extraordinary event that people can maintain a stable mental health pattern for the majority of the year, but then be so affected by light levels that an imbalance occurs in the brain. These imbalances can lead to depression, hopelessness, and suicide. The main chemical involved in the brain during this process is serotonin, which is recorded as being in lower than average levels in patients suffering from the disorder. It appears that the brain becomes incapable of converting serotonin into N-acetylserotonin, which involves the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase. In certain cases, antidepressants function by increasing levels of the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase in order to increase levels of conversion and a reduction of depression-like symptoms. It has been discovered that patients that suffer from this disorder often have a delay in their circadian rhythm, which is a delay in their sleep patterns. The relation to sleep patterns also promotes the idea that the hormone melatonin is affected by this disorder. There are a variety of other factors that can contribute to suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder, including a person’s predisposition to personality traits, such as agreeableness and an avoidance-orientated coping style (Seasonal Affective Disorder).

In order to begin alleviating the effects of Seasonal Affective Disorder, the interventions of light therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and supplementation of the hormone melatonin have been utilized, but I will focus on light therapy. In terms of light therapy, the use of a lightbox that emits an elevated level of lumens is necessary. The lights of the lamps can range in wavelength and lumen levels, usually depending on the light of the lamp: bright white “full spectrum” lights at 10,000 lux, blue light at a wavelength of 480 nm at 2,500 lux, or green-blue light at a wavelength of 500 nm at 350 lux. The process of light therapy usually lasts 30-60 minutes of being exposed to the light consistently.

 

Sources:

Seasonal Affective Disorder.” National Institute of Mental Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/seasonal-affective-disorder/index.shtml.

Tommy Manning Act

Author: Aimee Garcia

Seattle has a relatively new initiative to help people with traumatic brain injury named The Washington Traumatic Brain Injury Strategic Partnership Advisory Council, commonly known as the Tommy Manning Act. It was created through House Bill 2055 by the Washington State Legislature in 2007. It is to “recognize the current programs and services are not funded or designed to address the diverse needs of individuals with traumatic brain injuries.”  Its creation is to close the gap in knowledge by collecting the expertise from both the public and private sector. Membership includes twenty two people from both sectors that includes medical professionals, human service providers, family members of individuals, state agency representatives, and many more that can provide useful information to advance their agenda.

The Tommy Manning Act has taken upon itself to work in unison with the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services to address some of their goals. Unfortunately, the Manning Act has not posted their own goals on their website but directs the reader to the DSHS website, where they do not explicitly have goals that directly affect people with brain injuries.

Though the act is still fairly, new it could potentially have the momentum to change the lives and the families of those who have been affected by traumatic brain injuries. Yet, they have not stated their own goals and rely heavily on DSHS without any visible momentum to directly address the concerns of people with brain injuries. Yes, the program are only eleven years old but in those years, there has not been noticeable change for the people most in need.

Sources:

“Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council.” Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Council | DSHS, www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/traumatic-brain-injury/traumatic-brain-injury-advisory-council.

“About Us.” About Us | DSHS, www.dshs.wa.gov/altsa/about-us.

 

What Licensed Naturopaths Say About MS

Author: Catherine Waterbury

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, MS is “an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body.” MS effects more than 2.3 million people worldwide and can be extremely difficult to diagnose. Unfortunately, there is not a cure for MS. Common treatments for MS include: teaming up with a healthcare provider, taking pharmaceutical medication, and participating in physical therapy.

MS-Symptoms-FB
MS-Symptoms-FB

Other treatment options for MS are referred to as “Commentary or Alternative Medicines” (CAM). These treatments include exercise, alternative diet, and the addition of supplements. In a study done by members of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, 52% of the naturopaths being surveyed suggested dietary changes to treat MS. The study also indicated that 45% of the naturopaths suggested essential fatty acid supplementation and 33% suggested vitamin/mineral supplementation. At the end of the study, 59% of patients claimed they experienced an improved quality of life by using a CAM system.

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society advises those with MS to not “abandon conventional therapy” and be sure to “keep your physician informed about everything you are taking”. With that being said, if you are interested in adding elements of CAM system to your treatment, you should! There are a large variety of therapies you could try, including: acupuncture, nutrition lessons, exercise, cooking classes, and many more!

Can-acupuncture-mend-a-broken-heart
Can-acupuncture-mend-a-broken-heart

If you have MS and are interested in an CAM style therapy, The Plus One Foundation may be able to help you fund your therapy. Please look over our website for more information!

Sources:

"Home." National Multiple Sclerosis Society. N.p., 16 Feb. 2018. Web. 20 Feb. 2018.

"All IssuesUp Arrow In This IssueDown Arrow Left ArrowPrevious Article Next ArticleRight Arrow The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine About This Journal... Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis: Survey of Licensed Naturopaths." The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. N.p., n.d. Web.

Diabetes While Young

Author: Farhan Mohamed

I learned that the trouble in my family had finally reached me. I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in May 2015. Since then my life has changed in many ways. I’ve been living with diabetes and I’ve learned a lot about myself since then. When I first learned I had diabetes, I was scared, and it was a big shock. My life was going to change. I couldn’t enjoy the things I loved anymore. All the sugary foods and drinks I had everyday were going to be a thing of the past. I was addicted to eating cookies. Cookies were and still are my favorite desert. It was something that was hard to give up but for my health I was willing to let it all go. I found a new passion for eating healthier. I was extreme with my diet and only ate foods that my nutritionist told me was okay. I gave up breads, pastas, and only drank water. This new healthy lifestyle lasted only 8 months and after then I slowly slipped back into my regular diet. I forgot I had diabetes and stopped taking my medicine. This was very dangerous for me. A normal person is supposed to have a blood sugar level between 80 and 120 and when I went to my yearly diabetes appointment last year my blood sugar level was 577.  My doctor was shocked and told me to fix my life because a person as young as I am can reverse a lot of the diabetes and live a healthy lifestyle through good dieting and working out. I am now on the road to recovery and my medication has changed. It is hard to give up the temptations of sugar, but I know I must change things while young or my diabetes will consume me when I’m older. It’s hard to take my medication every day and I’m still not good at remembering but I’m making an effort.

Diabetes is a disease that involves issues with insulin production in the body. There is no cure for diabetes. The only way to combat diabetes is to stay healthy with diet and exercise. There are three major types of diabetes being type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes often begins in childhood. It is an autoimmune condition. Treatment for type 1 diabetes involves taking insulin that is injected via syringes. You can keep track of how good you are taking care of your diabetes through your A1C level from the blood test. It estimates your glucose level in your blood over the previous three months. It’s helpful to help identify glucose level control and risks of complications from the disease. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and it accounts for 95% of diabetes cases in adults. Type 2 diabetes is milder than type 1 but can still cause a lot of complications. Type 2 diabetes effects the small blood vessels in the body that nourish the kidneys, nerves, and eyes. It is very controllable through diet and medication. For more information about diabetes check with your doctor.

 

Sources:

"Types of Diabetes Mellitus." WebMD. WebMD, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2018.

Traveling as a Stress Reliever

Author: Erin Keating

Shoes off, sweater off, everything out of my pockets. Laptop in separate bin, backpack and everything else in another. Arms up over head and feet spread slightly. Grab everything as fast as you can and head to the gate.

Airport security is something I like to think that I have mastered. I have learned a lot of tricks for making my time at the airport as easy as possible. Like not wearing difficult shoes, just a pair that you can take on and off easily. And making sure you at least have a couple snacks with you since airport food is more expensive and not that great.

Traveling is one of my passions and I’m always on the lookout for another opportunity to escape, especially somewhere warm in the winter months. Living on the west coast, a popular place I like to go to is California, sometimes to visit family in San Francisco and sometimes to just have fun in Los Angeles.

Screen Shot 2018-02-10 at 12.12.53 PM
Screen Shot 2018-02-10 at 12.12.53 PM

Recently, I went to London and Paris for a month. I learned so much about new cultures and art and it was so much fun to roam new cities I have never been to before. There are great benefits for travel and I have found that by saving up a little bit here and there, making a trip happen is easy.

A study published by HostelWorld Global Traveler Report showed that there are five significant benefits of traveling abroad. First being that traveling makes you healthier and decreases the risk of heart disease. It also reduces stress, specifically after you’ve returned home and are feeling the benefits of being well rested and at ease. Traveling as makes you more creative with the immersion into a culture. It increases your happiness and satisfaction levels and it decreases depression.

All of these benefits I can attest to. When I return home from traveling, I feel happy to be home and to see my family and friends, but I also feel like I have gained a new experience and fun memories to look back on.

Sources:

"5 Reasons Traveling Abroad Is Seriously Good for Your Health." NBCNews.com. NBCUniversal News Group, n.d. Web. 10 Feb. 2018.

I Don't Have Time!

Author: Olivia Tang

Whether it’s because of school, work, or a combination of both. Our professional and educational lives seem to get in the way of doing what we love!

Admittedly, when I started my first year of college I had trouble adjusting to the class structure and the freedom of choosing what to do with my time. Teachers in high school would spend more time on topics than professors in college. The pace of college classes was faster as well.

Being new to the college grind, I didn’t know how to allocate my time for my classes while also leaving time for fun and social life. This made it easy for me to think that I didn’t have any free time at all. Everything became more manageable after I started planning.

Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 2.47.11 PM.png
Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 2.47.11 PM.png

I started writing down all my tasks for the day into my sketchbook. I write everything I need to get done for the next week, and I circle all the important tasks I need to get done. I find that crossing off the tasks at the end of the day to be incredibly satisfying, and whenever I don’t have a spurt of motivation when I need it I use that time to draw in my sketchbook. It gives me more time to look at the to do list I’ve made for myself on the page and it also gives me time to do something I love, drawing! Psychologists say that 25% of our happiness comes from how we manage our own stress.

We feel happiness due to the effects of Dopamine, Oxytocin, Serotonin and Endorphins. Together these chemicals help design our own happiness. According to Nicole Lazzaro, a world-renowned game designer that specializes on gamifying experiences, each chemical that affects our happiness plays a different role in how we experience happiness.

Lazzaro explains that we typically think of Dopamine as the “happiness drug” when in reality dopamine more affects our feeling of anticipation. Oxytocin is the chemical that allows us to feel empathy, and we feel closer to close friends and family when it is released. Serotonin is a mood regulated, which means it is responsible for our good moods and our bad moods, and Endorphins are hormones that mask pain and discomfort and help us power through workouts and achieve our goals.(Buckner)

Stress depletes these chemicals. When we are stressed we produce the stress hormone, cortisol. Cortisol depletes our levels serotonin and dopamine--chemicals that affect our motivation, and susceptibility to depression and anxiety. It’s normal to deal with stress, but it is not easy to deal with. Psychologist, Robert Epstein says “The most important way to manage stress is to prevent it from ever occurring.”- which means planning ahead!

Sources:

Buckner, Clark. "4 Chemicals That Activate Happiness, and How to Use Them."TechnologyAdvice. N.p., 18 Oct. 2017. Web. 01 Feb. 2018.

"Chronic Stress – The Effects On Your Brain." Australian Spinal Research Foundation. N.p., 30 June 2016. Web. 01 Feb. 2018.

Peláez, Marina Watson. "Plan Your Way to Less Stress, More Happiness." Time. Time, 31 May 2011. Web. 01 Feb. 2018.

Getting in the Habit

10443201_10204271502925609_1769605977399701449_o.jpg

Author: Kelsey Fukuda

As a senior in college, I want to express thankfulness towards my parents for continuously involving me in activities when I was younger.

In middle and high school, they encouraged me to join cheerleading, gymnastics, and ice skating. I admit that it was a lot easier to feel healthy when I was constantly exercising and had home cooked meals for me. When I started college, I had only moved about 15 miles away from home, but I was living in the dorms away from my family.

It was hard adjusting to a life where I was so busy with school work and I felt like I didn’t have the time or energy to maintain healthy habits.

 

In my junior year I started running with my roommate on a consistent basis. When you exercise with a friend, there’s a lot of joint motivation and you try to keep each other accountable. Now, in my senior year, my roommate stopped running but I’ve continued going. This is a huge contrast from what my life used to be like. Before, I used to think that exercising without being on a team or without a coach would be scary and difficult.

Looking back, I think the hardest thing about habits is introducing new ones into your life. It’s disruptive when you’ve become comfortable with something else. The next hardest thing is maintaining what you are doing when you start doing things right. However, just forcing myself to start leading a healthier lifestyle was a huge factor in improving how I feel now. Setting goals for myself that I felt like I could achieve greatly improved my mindset. Studies find that exercising is so good for your health AND your brain! Aerobic exercise improves brain function. Running in particular is associated with cell growth in the hippocampus (part of the brain related to learning and memory).

giphy.gif

My other habit I had issues with that I’m still working on involves cooking. My dad loves to cook, so before I moved away for college I hardly ever went out to eat. Last year I was talking with a classmate about desiring to cook my own meals more. She exclaimed that she recently started cooking her own meals and gave me a few tips: have a few favorite recipes, compile recipe lists for grocery shopping, and meal prep whenever possible.

One study found that cooking at home is both healthier and cheaper. Home cooked meals are associated with greater dietary compliance. Making home cooked meals has so many benefits and I want to get better at making it a habit! In relation to the brain, cooking helps people organize, prioritize, sustain focus, solve problems, retrieve memories and multitask.

My main takeaway for getting in the habit of exercising or cooking: if you have time, just do it! These habits are both better for you and they make you feel better yourself.

Sources:

https://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/everyday-brain-fitness/physical-exercise  

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170314150926.htm

https://healthybrains.org/cooking-cognition-making-meal-good-brain

Being a Gymnast

Author: Catherine Bennion

As a semi-serious gymnast, I can easily say that there is no other relief like the relief that comes from exercise. There are few feelings greater than reaching a goal that I have been working towards for a while, or leaving a good workout feeling proud and accomplished. Being in school, I often go to practice after a long and stressful day and the last thing I want to do is exercise. It seems like too much, and a waste of time when I could be doing other things to reduce stress. Though after practice, I always leave feeling accomplished and free of stress, and exercise was a great distraction for all of the many other things going on in my life. This is because exercise triggers the release of chemicals in your body such as serotonin, norepinephrine, endorphins, dopamine. These chemicals dull pain, release stress, and make you happier. Not only will exercise make you feel better, but exercising even just once a week is great for your physical health.

Not only is exercise good for your physical health, but it is overwhelmingly great for your brain as well. Increased level of exercise are linked to decreases in depression, better memory, and faster learning. Additionally, recent studies have shown that exercising is the best way to prevent or delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Though it is not clear why, scientists know that exercise changes the structure of the brain for the better. It increases blood flow to the brain which helps to promote the growth of new brain cells. It also triggers the release a protein in the brain called BDNF that triggers the growth of new neurons and helps to mend and protect the brain from regeneration.

I have been doing gymnastics for 12 years now and I can easily say that I have never regretted going to practice, though I have regretted not going. Exercise is one of the best releases for stress, as well as improving self-esteem and making you feel great! Next time you have an hour to spare, consider doing something active; go for a run or bike ride, take a yoga class or go for a swim, whatever works for you.

Sources:

http://time.com/4474874/exercise-fitness-workouts/

Hiking = Happiness!

rattlesnake.jpeg

Author: Daniel Nguyen

As an individual who constantly enjoys being outdoors, I would say that hiking is a must-try activity here in the Pacific Northwest. There are so many different opportunities here to take a hike, and many of them reward you with a fantastic view at the end. Whether it is a calm isolated lake, or a ledge giving you a bird’s-eye view of a canyon, hiking not only rewards you with a view, but benefits your health as well! Researchers from Stanford University’s School of Graduate Education has discovered that a mere hour of hiking can burn well over 500 calories! However, each hiking trail is different in terms of difficulty such as incline, so make sure you pick a hike that you think is right for you!

Hiking also helps your body in many ways, not just burning calories. Studies from the International Journal of Sports Medicine found that long distance hikes can improve the body’s antioxidative capacity which helps fight disease in oncological patients. The physical benefits you get with hiking also improves cardiovascular health. But that’s not all! Research has shown that hiking can serve as another form of therapy that can significantly help those who have depression. Having an active lifestyle will help individuals feel less hopeless. So not only does hiking have health benefits, it can have emotional benefits as well!

I have hiked more than dozens of times in the Pacific Northwest, and I can say that I have never been to a hike where I regretted it. I strongly recommend hiking to anyone, especially those who don’t see nature often. If you’ve never hiked before, I suggest starting small and choose a hike that won’t be too much for your body to handle. Even if the hike is very short, it is better than not hiking at all. Last but not least, I would advise to hike with as many of your friends and family as you can!

Sources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/18/how-taking-a-hike-can-mak_n_5584809.html

http://www.wta.org/go-hiking/hikes/rattle-snake-ledge

Get Outside!

DSC_0591 Author: Darby Jenny

Living in Seattle gives us so many opportunities to get outside and enjoy nature. In a one hour drive you can be in the beautiful alpine wilderness or you can take a short bus ride and make it to one of Seattle's phenomenal parks. Seattle is so connected to the natural world and there is a myriad of opportunities to explore it. Even better, time outside can help your brain! This has been something many people have noticed for centuries but there has not always been empirical evidence.

There are so many wonderful aspects of nature such as lush forests, the scent of flowers, fresh air, sunlight, and so much more. But what is it about nature that helps the brain and how does it help? A study at Stanford University sought out to find just how much nature and green spaces affects brain activity. The study had volunteers walk through either a park or along a busy highway. The researchers analyzed activity in the prefrontal cortex of the brain that is the area associated with decision-making and personality behavior. Not surprisingly the people who walked in nature were more relaxed and less stressed and there was less blood flow to the subgenual prefrontal cortex, which supports the hypothesis. Walking outside is such an easy solution to reducing stress in your life and in turn helping your brain.

Countries outside of the United States have even began promoting spending time outside as a public health initiative. In Finland the government recommends spending 40-50 minutes outside to produce physiological changes. South Korea has gone one step further and has designated three forests as healing forests with plans for many more.

If you are looking to find a great hike near you I suggest checking out wta.org for information about all the hiking trails in Washington. Additionally, Seattle has many wonderful parks that might be more accessible than a day hike. Some of my favorites are: Discovery Park, Seward Park, and Carkeek Park.

Sources: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/01/call-to-wild/ https://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2015/07/22/how-nature-changes-the-brain/?referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2F

 

Fidget Spinners: Toy or Therapy?

Author: Melissa Chan

In the past few months, one toy has swept the nation: fidget spinners. If you’ve never heard of them, or if you’ve heard of them but aren’t sure what they look like, this is the toy everyone’s been talking about:

lame
lame

These spinning toys have a simple structure and concept, yet they have become one of the most popular toys this year. Though its audience has expanded to the ordinary person, fidget spinners have been continuously advertised as being able to relieve stress, increase focus, and even relieve symptoms of anxiety, ADHD, and autism. But, do these claims hold true? According to experts, these claims have no scientific evidence. Scott Kollins, a clinical psychologist and professor at Duke University, shared, “I know there's lots of similar toys, just like there's lots of other games and products marketed toward individuals who have ADHD, and there's basically no scientific evidence that those things work across the board.” In other words, fidget spinners may work for some, but ultimately, there is no scientific evidence to support the idea that they have therapeutic qualities.

With more than six million children in the United States diagnosed with ADHD, there is a huge market for therapy/treatments to help these children cope with their ADHD symptoms. Fidget spinners are relatively cheap and if buying one is helpful, then that’s great. However, people shouldn’t jump to the conclusion that these toys are a replacement for therapy or treatment. As Dr. David Anderson, a clinical psychologist and senior director of the ADHD and Behavioral Disorders Center at the New York-based nonprofit Child Mind Institute, put it, “Mental illness is difficult to treat, and it’s not something for which there are simple solutions.”

On another note, if you’re looking for a fun toy this summer and want to understand the craze around fidget spinners, buy one and see for yourself! You never know, it might just be the perfect stress reliever for you...

Sources: http://www.newsweek.com/fidget-spinners-help-anxiety-adhd-609307 http://www.npr.org/2017/05/14/527988954/whirring-purring-fidget-spinners-provide-entertainment-not-adhd-help